【News】Our No no Ikebana:“I want to express how the life spring from the soil,” says Harue Morita from Hachioji, Tokyo (Jun 2, 2017)


“Sprouts from the soil”

“Sprouts from the soil”

私たちの農の生け花カット“I decorate the entrance with a No-no-Ikebana arrangement to welcome my guests. Until 1999, my family used to run a dairy farm, so I often use milkers as my containers. My favorite materials are burdocks, carrots, Chinese cabbages and other vegetables that I grow for my family.

I’ve been doing No-no-Ikebana for about 20 years. Whenever I find vegetables in unique shapes, I get excited and start thinking how I can use them in my arrangements. My husband also gives me an idea when he finds vegetables in funny shapes. That way, I want to respect individual characters of each piece of the vegetables.

Morita (bottom left corner) takes part in local No no Ikebana exhibitions and helps the expansion of the new art form.

Morita takes part in local No no Ikebana exhibitions and helps the expansion of the new art form.

For this arrangement, I chose sprouting vegetables and yangyou (a classic tool designed to plow hard soil) in order to express how the life springs from the soil. I let the potatoes sprout and grow to this length to show the power of the soil. Bamboo shoots are making the whole arrangement dynamic. Each of them is cut in a certain shape so that it can sit nicely in the rice mortar.

<Containers and tools> a rice mortar, yangyou, and a bamboo basket

<Materials>  bamboo shoots, wheat, baby taro root stems, radishes, potatoes, and spring onions

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