Category Archives: Photos

[Our Noh no Ikebana] “I’d like to celebrate the coming of the autumn,” says Michiko Sekimori, 70, from Chofu, Tokyo

“I’ve been enjoying Noh no Ikebana for almost 13 years. One day, I saw the arrangements of the No-no-ikebana group in Tokyo at a gathering among female farmers in Tachikawa, Tokyo, and thought I want to do it myself. “Look, you are going to be a star. Let’s have fun on the stage together.” I always talk to the flowers and materials silently while I make arrangements. The theme of this arrangement I created this October is “Fall finally came!” It’s been a very hot summer, so I used Japanese silver grass and persimmons to express my happiness to welcome the autumn. I would like you to pay extra attention … Continue reading

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“Honnyo” stands in rice fields as symbol of rice growing culture in Kurihara City, Miyagi Prefecture

It’s believed that the name “Honnyo” has come from “honio,” the name of the method of stacking freshly-harvested rice plants, or from “honioh” from the shape that looks like a temple guardian. To make Honnyo, you assemble four bunches of the rice plants in the shape of a cross and hung them around a cedar pole of two to three meters long which stands in the rice fields. Usually, you can place around 30 of them per 10 are. Farmers in Nagasaki region do it a little differently, by making triangles with the rice plants and assemble them on the pole in an angle so that the tips of the … Continue reading

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[Our Noh no Ikebana] “I love looking at plants swaying in the breeze,” says Setsuko Tanakadate, 71, from Yahaba town, Iwate Prefecture (October 16, 2018)

“It’s been nearly 30 years since I started Noh no Ikebana. We can find materials at home and our vegetable gardens and arrange them freely regardless of schools or styles, and that’s why I’m doing it for such a long time with friends from a local Noh no Ikebana club. When we participate in prefecture exhibitions or local events, we share the materials and tools. Showing the arrangements with each other is fun. I always place importance on the sense of seasons. I enjoy using dead plants as well, in addition to fresh vegetables and plants. This way, I can express the passing of the seasons. Dried hydrangea is one … Continue reading

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Cowskin wallets with flawless webbed pattern looking so plush and tasty

TOKYO, Sep. 26 – A Tokyo-based leather goods manufacturer and seller has released a line of items made of leather looking exactly like the skin of Shizuoka crown melon. The company, Earl’s Favorite, has succeeded in delicately recreating the beautiful webbing seen on the surface of the king of fruits in Japan by embossing the pattern on domestically-tanned cow leather. Currently, it sells wallets, smartphone cases and several other items made of the melon-skin leather with excellent texture. Even the color inside its products is chosen very carefully – juicy pale yellow-green, which is the color of the flesh of Shizuoka crown melons. To recreate the perfect texture and the … Continue reading

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Japan’s Hamatako offers sea salt with local edible flowers

TOYOAKE, Sept. 5 ― Edible flowers are making their way, not on top of menu items, but by blending with sea salt, into a variety of food and beverage. Hamataco Co. Ltd., an Aichi prefecture-based restaurant that makes takoyaki, or an octopus ball, has blended sea salt with locally made edible flowers. “In this way, it adds fresh floral flavors and aroma to salt,” said Masahito Hamada, Hamataco’s president in Toyoake city, which is well-known for the floral market. “I hope people will become interested in floral flavors in foods,” Hamada added.

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